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SAFE Port Act: Container Security
This is a part of the Safety and Accountability For Every Port Act (SAFE Port Act), originally approved in 2006 as Public Law 109-347 and subsequently amended. The text shown here is as codified in Chapter 3 of Title 6 (Domestic Security) of the U.S. Code. Some other parts of the SAFE Port Act were codified in Title 46 (Shipping) of the U.S. Code.

 

 

 

See the full SAFE Port Act as enacted in 2006 (i.e., with some items unrelated to this subject but not including subsequent amendments to the law itself); this is a large PDF file.

Other provisions in the SAFE Port Act related to maritime security include:


See also the CENTRAL guide to Security, Sanctions, and Compliance for links to other laws on , as well as other U.S. laws on Maritime Security and related matters.

 

 

 


§944. Container security standards and procedures

(a) Establishment

(1) In general

Not later than 90 days after October 13, 2006, the Secretary shall initiate a rulemaking proceeding to establish minimum standards and procedures for securing containers in transit to the United States.

(2) Interim rule

Not later than 180 days after October 13, 2006, the Secretary shall issue an interim final rule pursuant to the proceeding described in paragraph (1).

(3) Missed deadline

If the Secretary is unable to meet the deadline established pursuant to paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit a letter to the appropriate congressional committees explaining why the Secretary is unable to meet that deadline and describing what must be done before such minimum standards and procedures can be established.

(4) Deadline for enforcement

(A) Enforcement of rule

Not later than 2 years after the date on which the standards and procedures are established pursuant to paragraph (1), all containers bound for ports of entry in the United States shall meet such standards and procedures.

(B) Interim requirement

If the interim final rule described in paragraph (2) is not issued by April 1, 2008, then—

(i) effective not later than October 15, 2008, all containers in transit to the United States shall be required to meet the requirements of International Organization for Standardization Publicly Available Specification 17712 standard for sealing containers; and

(ii) the requirements of this subparagraph shall cease to be effective upon the effective date of the interim final rule issued pursuant to this subsection.

(b) Review and enhancement

The Secretary shall regularly review and enhance the standards and procedures established pursuant to subsection (a), as appropriate, based on tests of technologies as they become commercially available to detect container intrusion and the highest consequence threats, particularly weapons of mass destruction.

(c) International cargo security standards

The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Energy, and other Federal Government officials, as appropriate, and with the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, the Homeland Security Advisory Committee, and the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee, is encouraged to promote and establish international standards for the security of containers moving through the international supply chain with foreign governments and international organizations, including the International Maritime Organization, the International Organization for Standardization, the International Labor Organization, and the World Customs Organization.

(d) International trade and other obligations

In carrying out this section, the Secretary shall consult with appropriate Federal departments and agencies and private sector stakeholders and ensure that actions under this section do not violate international trade obligations or other international obligations of the United States.

§945. Container Security Initiative

(a) Establishment

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall establish and implement a program (referred to in this section as the “Container Security Initiative” or “CSI”) to identify and examine or search maritime containers that pose a security risk before loading such containers in a foreign port for shipment to the United States, either directly or through a foreign port.

(b) Assessment

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, may designate foreign seaports to participate in the Container Security Initiative after the Secretary has assessed the costs, benefits, and other factors associated with such designation, including—

(1) the level of risk for the potential compromise of containers by terrorists, or other threats as determined by the Secretary;

(2) the volume of cargo being imported to the United States directly from, or being transshipped through, the foreign seaport;

(3) the results of the Coast Guard assessments conducted pursuant to section 70108 of title 46;

(4) the commitment of the government of the country in which the foreign seaport is located to cooperating with the Department in sharing critical data and risk management information and to maintain programs to ensure employee integrity; and

(5) the potential for validation of security practices at the foreign seaport by the Department.

(c) Notification

The Secretary shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the designation of a foreign port under the Container Security Initiative or the revocation of such a designation before notifying the public of such designation or revocation.

(d) Negotiations

The Secretary, in cooperation with the Secretary of State and in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, may enter into negotiations with the government of each foreign nation in which a seaport is designated under the Container Security Initiative to ensure full compliance with the requirements under the Container Security Initiative.

(e) Overseas inspections

(1) Requirements and procedures

The Secretary shall—

(A) establish minimum technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures for the use of nonintrusive inspection and nuclear and radiological detection systems in conjunction with CSI;

(B) require each port designated under CSI to operate nonintrusive inspection and nuclear and radiological detection systems in accordance with the technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures established under subparagraph (A);

(C) continually monitor the technologies, processes, and techniques used to inspect cargo at ports designated under CSI to ensure adherence to such criteria and the use of such procedures; and

(D) consult with the Secretary of Energy in establishing the minimum technical capability criteria and standard operating procedures established under subparagraph (A) pertaining to radiation detection technologies to promote consistency in detection systems at foreign ports designated under CSI.

(2) Constraints

The criteria and procedures established under paragraph (1)(A)—

(A) shall be consistent, as practicable, with relevant standards and procedures utilized by other Federal departments or agencies, or developed by international bodies if the United States consents to such standards and procedures;

(B) shall not apply to activities conducted under the Megaports Initiative of the Department of Energy; and

(C) shall not be designed to endorse the product or technology of any specific company or to conflict with the sovereignty of a country in which a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative is located.

(f) Savings provision

The authority of the Secretary under this section shall not affect any authority or duplicate any efforts or responsibilities of the Federal Government with respect to the deployment of radiation detection equipment outside of the United States.

(g) Coordination

The Secretary shall—

(1) coordinate with the Secretary of Energy, as necessary, to provide radiation detection equipment required to support the Container Security Initiative through the Department of Energy's Second Line of Defense Program and Megaports Initiative; or

(2) work with the private sector or host governments, when possible, to obtain radiation detection equipment that meets the Department's and the Department of Energy's technical specifications for such equipment.

(h) Staffing

The Secretary shall develop a human capital management plan to determine adequate staffing levels in the United States and in foreign seaports including, as appropriate, the remote location of personnel in countries in which foreign seaports are designated under the Container Security Initiative.

(i) Annual discussions

The Secretary, in coordination with the appropriate Federal officials, shall hold annual discussions with foreign governments of countries in which foreign seaports designated under the Container Security Initiative are located regarding best practices, technical assistance, training needs, and technological developments that will assist in ensuring the efficient and secure movement of international cargo.

(j) Lesser risk port

The Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, may treat cargo loaded in a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative as presenting a lesser risk than similar cargo loaded in a foreign seaport that is not designated under the Container Security Initiative, for the purpose of clearing such cargo into the United States.

(k) Prohibition

(1) In general

The Secretary shall issue a “do not load” order, using existing authorities, to prevent the onload of any cargo loaded at a port designated under CSI that has been identified as high risk, including by the Automated Targeting System, unless the cargo is determined to no longer be high risk through—

(A) a scan of the cargo with nonintrusive imaging equipment and radiation detection equipment;

(B) a search of the cargo; or

(C) additional information received by the Department.

(2) Rule of construction

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to interfere with the ability of the Secretary to deny entry of any cargo into the United States.

(l) Report

(1) In general

Not later than September 30, 2007, the Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall, in consultation with other appropriate government officials and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on the effectiveness of, and the need for any improvements to, the Container Security Initiative. The report shall include—

(A) a description of the technical assistance delivered to, as well as needed at, each designated seaport;

(B) a description of the human capital management plan at each designated seaport;

(C) a summary of the requests made by the United States to foreign governments to conduct physical or nonintrusive inspections of cargo at designated seaports, and whether each such request was granted or denied by the foreign government;

(D) an assessment of the effectiveness of screening, scanning, and inspection protocols and technologies utilized at designated seaports and the effect on the flow of commerce at such seaports, as well as any recommendations for improving the effectiveness of screening, scanning, and inspection protocols and technologies utilized at designated seaports;

(E) a description and assessment of the outcome of any security incident involving a foreign seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative;

(F) the rationale for the continuance of each port designated under CSI;

(G) a description of the potential for remote targeting to decrease the number of personnel who are deployed at foreign ports under CSI; and

(H) a summary and assessment of the aggregate number and extent of trade compliance lapses at each seaport designated under the Container Security Initiative.

(2) Updated report

Not later than September 30, 2010, the Secretary, acting through the Commissioner, shall, in consultation with other appropriate government officials and the Commercial Operations Advisory Committee, submit an updated report to the appropriate congressional committees on the effectiveness of, and the need for any improvements to, the Container Security Initiative. The updated report shall address each of the elements required to be included in the report provided for under paragraph (1).

(m) Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the United States Customs and Border Protection to carry out the provisions of this section—

(1) $144,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;

(2) $146,000,000 for fiscal year 2009; and

(3) $153,300,000 for fiscal year 2010.

[...]

§982. Screening and scanning of cargo containers

(a) One hundred percent screening of cargo containers and 100 percent scanning of high-risk containers

(1) Screening of cargo containers

The Secretary shall ensure that 100 percent of the cargo containers originating outside the United States and unloaded at a United States seaport undergo a screening to identify high-risk containers.

(2) Scanning of high-risk containers

The Secretary shall ensure that 100 percent of the containers that have been identified as high-risk under paragraph (1), or through other means, are scanned or searched before such containers leave a United States seaport facility.

(b) Full-scale implementation

(1) In general

A container that was loaded on a vessel in a foreign port shall not enter the United States (either directly or via a foreign port) unless the container was scanned by nonintrusive imaging equipment and radiation detection equipment at a foreign port before it was loaded on a vessel.

(2) Application

Paragraph (1) shall apply with respect to containers loaded on a vessel in a foreign country on or after the earlier of—

(A) July 1, 2012; or

(B) such other date as may be established by the Secretary under paragraph (3).

(3) Establishment of earlier deadline

The Secretary shall establish a date under (2)(B) pursuant to the lessons learned through the pilot integrated scanning systems established under section 981 of this title.

(4) Extensions

The Secretary may extend the date specified in paragraph (2)(A) or (2)(B) for 2 years, and may renew the extension in additional 2-year increments, for containers loaded in a port or ports, if the Secretary certifies to Congress that at least two of the following conditions exist:

(A) Systems to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) are not available for purchase and installation.

(B) Systems to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) do not have a sufficiently low false alarm rate for use in the supply chain.

(C) Systems to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) cannot be purchased, deployed, or operated at ports overseas, including, if applicable, because a port does not have the physical characteristics to install such a system.

(D) Systems to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) cannot be integrated, as necessary, with existing systems.

(E) Use of systems that are available to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) will significantly impact trade capacity and the flow of cargo.

(F) Systems to scan containers in accordance with paragraph (1) do not adequately provide an automated notification of questionable or high-risk cargo as a trigger for further inspection by appropriately trained personnel.

(5) Exemption for military cargo

Notwithstanding any other provision in the section, supplies bought by the Secretary of Defense and transported in compliance section 2631 of title 10 and military cargo of foreign countries are exempt from the requirements of this section.

(6) Report on extensions

An extension under paragraph (4) for a port or ports shall take effect upon the expiration of the 60-day period beginning on the date the Secretary provides a report to Congress that—

(A) states what container traffic will be affected by the extension;

(B) provides supporting evidence to support the Secretary's certification of the basis for the extension; and

(C) explains what measures the Secretary is taking to ensure that scanning can be implemented as early as possible at the port or ports that are the subject of the report.

(7) Report on renewal of extension

If an extension under paragraph (4) takes effect, the Secretary shall, after one year, submit a report to Congress on whether the Secretary expects to seek to renew the extension.

(8) Scanning technology standards

In implementing paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

(A) establish technological and operational standards for systems to scan containers;

(B) ensure that the standards are consistent with the global nuclear detection architecture developed under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 [6 U.S.C. 101 et seq.]; and

(C) coordinate with other Federal agencies that administer scanning or detection programs at foreign ports.

(9) International trade and other obligations

In carrying out this subsection, the Secretary shall consult with appropriate Federal departments and agencies and private sector stakeholders, and ensure that actions under this section do not violate international trade obligations, and are consistent with the World Customs Organization framework, or other international obligations of the United States.

(c) Report

Not later than 6 months after the submission of a report under section 981(d) of this title, and every 6 months thereafter, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees describing the status of full-scale deployment under subsection (b) and the cost of deploying the system at each foreign port at which the integrated scanning systems are deployed.

§983. Inspection technology and training

(1) In general

The Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Energy, and appropriate representatives of other Federal agencies, may provide technical assistance, equipment, and training to facilitate the implementation of supply chain security measures at ports designated under the Container Security Initiative.

(2) Acquisition and training

Unless otherwise prohibited by law, the Secretary may—

(A) lease, loan, provide, or otherwise assist in the deployment of nonintrusive inspection and radiation detection equipment at foreign land and sea ports under such terms and conditions as the Secretary prescribes, including nonreimbursable loans or the transfer of ownership of equipment; and

(B) provide training and technical assistance for domestic or foreign personnel responsible for operating or maintaining such equipment.

§984. Pilot program to improve the security of empty containers

(a) In general

The Secretary shall conduct a 1-year pilot program to assess the risk posed by and improve the security of empty containers at United States seaports to ensure the safe and secure delivery of cargo and to prevent potential acts of terrorism involving such containers. The pilot program shall include the use of visual searches of empty containers at United States seaports.

(b) Report

Not later than 90 days after the completion of the pilot program under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall prepare and submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that contains—

(1) the results of the pilot program; and

(2) the determination of the Secretary on whether to expand the pilot program.